PEKIN — Police reports and the recollections of a former acquaintance paint a disturbing picture about Travis Reinking, the Morton man accused of killing four people and wounding two others early Sunday at a restaurant near Nashville, Tenn.

"The police reports speak for themselves. I think anyone can conclude after reading them that there's evidence (Reinking) has mental health issues," Tazewell County Sheriff Bob Huston said Sunday at a news conference in the county's Criminal Justice Center in Pekin.

Huston distributed reports that detail Reinking's dealings with police the past several years.

Among those reports was an May 26, 2016, incident in the parking lot of a CVS in Morton, where Reinking believed singer Taylor Swift was hacking his cellphone and stalking him. His family had told Tazewell County deputies that he had been having delusions for almost two years.Deputies and a member of the Tazewell County Emergency Response Services division finally convinced him to be evaluated at UnityPoint Health Methodist, which handles many mental health issues.

Deputies were told Reinking's family was concerned about him because Reinking had talked about killing himself. Reinking agreed not to drive away from the CVS parking lot so he could be taken to a hospital for an evaluation, but said it was against his will.

Reinking also told deputies a few weeks earlier, Swift hacked his Netflix account and told him to meet her at the Dairy Queen in downtown Morton.

When he arrived at the Dairy Queen, Reinking said, Swift was across the street yelling at him and ran away. Reinking said Swift went to the rooftop of a building and he followed her there, but when he got there, she was gone.

A report from last August indicated that Travis Reinking thought as many as 20 to 30 people were tapping into his cellphone because he could hear them through his speakers.

One of the most recent was Aug. 11, 2017, when Reinking got out of his car and spoke with a Tazewell sheriff's deputy at the intersection of State Route 9 and Baer Road in rural Tremont.

Reinking told the deputy 20 to 30 people were hacking into his phone and computer, and he'd been hearing people outside his home barking like dogs.

He also said he was being watched and people were baiting him into breaking the law.

Thirteen days later, deputies took Reinking's four weapons and ammunition away from him because his Illinois Firearms Owners' Identification Card had been revoked by the Illinois State Police following Reinking's arrest by U.S. Secret Service agents in July 2017 for being in a restricted area near the White House.

According to The Associated Press, Reinking told agents he was at the White House because he wanted to meet President Donald Trump.

On June 16, 2017, Tremont police were called to the Tremont Pool after a man identified as Reinking dove into the pool wearing a pink woman's house coat, took off the coat and was swimming in his underwear.

Lifeguards told Reinking to get out of the pool. He yelled at the lifeguards, got out of the pool, and displayed his genitals to show lifeguards he's a man.

Pool employees declined to press charges.

An employee at J&J Cranes in Tremont, where Reinking lived in an apartment above the business, told police Reinking left the business just before the pool incident wearing a pink women's house coat after putting an AR-15 rifle into the trunk of his car.

Pool employees did not see Reinking with the weapon.

Deputies were told Reinking's family was concerned about him because Reinking had talked about killing himself. Reinking agreed not to drive away from the CVS parking lot so he could be taken to a hospital for an evaluation, but said it was against his will.

A 27-year-old Morton resident who asked to remain anonymous has a chilling recollection of Reinking from more than five years ago.

He recalls Reinking pointing an assault rifle at a group of about a half-dozen friends who had gathered for a night of video games at a home near Oak Lawn Mobile Estates in Morton where Reinking was residing with a roommate.

"I think (Reinking) brought the gun out to show it to us. He leveled it at our heads, then he put it away," the Morton resident said. "I didn't feel threatened, but I was unnerved."

He said he did not call police about the incident.

"I hadn't thought that night until (Sunday), when I learned about the shooting in Nashville. I haven't seen or spokes to Travis for at least five years."

The Morton resident said he recalls Reinking had anger issues.

"He'd get angry or frustrated easily," he said.

The Morton resident said he met Reinking through a group of friends who attended a Morton church.

Morton Police Chief Craig Hilliard said his office fielded several complaints about Reinking's driving but otherwise heard no serious allegations about him.

"We haven't had many calls with him," Hilliard said. "We haven't had much contact with him."

Steve Stein can be reached at 686-3114 or stevestein21@yahoo.com. Follow him on Twitter @SpartanSteve. Phil Luciano contributed to this story.